Human Nature: 8 streams of Intelligences

Greetings!

It is a privilege to posses some habits.

I think myself happy. I think myself happy because God Almighty has given me the grace and privilege to venture into things totally not relating to bread and water.

He has blessed me with the keen interest in understanding the bend in words. Not necessarily as one finding fault but as a custodian of great Wealth of Information.

The appetite i have for learning is amazing and sometimes i wonder at the pieces of knowledge i find myself encompassed about.

Why am i saying this?

I am saying this because i have learnt that to be successful in life one has to know what the #It is in the sentence “Making it”

Perhaps this post would be of help if i shared with readers who wish to make #It in life.Who knows?

I disperse this message as one would do seeds. I trust it shall be of help to someone somewhere in this work-A-Day world.

I present to you the 8 streams of Human Intelligence. In which one are you gifted? I know you ARE!!!

Multiple Intelligences

The theory of multiple intelligences was developed in 1983 by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on I.Q. testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligences to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults. These intelligences are:

  • Linguistic intelligence (“word smart”)
  • Logical-mathematical intelligence (“number/reasoning smart”)
  • Spatial intelligence (“picture smart”)
  • Bodily-Kinesthetic intelligence (“body smart”)
  • Musical intelligence (“music smart”)
  • Interpersonal intelligence (“people smart”)
  • Intrapersonal intelligence (“self smart”)
  • Naturalist intelligence (“nature smart”)

One of the most remarkable features of the theory of multiple intelligences is how it provides eight different potential pathways to learning.

Whatever you are teaching or learning, see how you might connect it with

  • words (linguistic intelligence)
  • numbers or logic (logical-mathematical intelligence)
  • pictures (spatial intelligence)
  • music (musical intelligence)
  • self-reflection (intrapersonal intelligence)
  • a physical experience (bodily-kinesthetic intelligence)
  • a social experience (interpersonal intelligence), and/or
  • an experience in the natural world. (naturalist intelligence

IN THE WORDS OF HOWARD

Howard Gardner initially formulated a list of seven intelligences. His listing was provisional. The first two have been typically valued in schools; the next three are usually associated with the arts; and the final two are what Howard Gardner called ‘personal intelligences’ (Gardner 1999: 41-43).

Linguistic intelligence involves sensitivity to spoken and written language, the ability to learn languages, and the capacity to use language to accomplish certain goals. This intelligence includes the ability to effectively use language to express oneself rhetorically or poetically; and language as a means to remember information. Writers, poets, lawyers and speakers are among those that Howard Gardner sees as having high linguistic intelligence.

Logical-mathematical intelligence consists of the capacity to analyze problems logically, carry out mathematical operations, and investigate issues scientifically. In Howard Gardner’s words, it entails the ability to detect patterns, reason deductively and think logically. This intelligence is most often associated with scientific and mathematical thinking.

Musical intelligence involves skill in the performance, composition, and appreciation of musical patterns. It encompasses the capacity to recognize and compose musical pitches, tones, and rhythms. According to Howard Gardner musical intelligence runs in an almost structural parallel to linguistic intelligence.

Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence entails the potential of using one’s whole body or parts of the body to solve problems. It is the ability to use mental abilities to coordinate bodily movements. Howard Gardner sees mental and physical activity as related.

Spatial intelligence involves the potential to recognize and use the patterns of wide space and more confined areas.

Interpersonal intelligence is concerned with the capacity to understand the intentions, motivations and desires of other people. It allows people to work effectively with others. Educators, salespeople, religious and political leaders and counsellors all need a well-developed interpersonal intelligence.

Intrapersonal intelligence entails the capacity to understand oneself, to appreciate one’s feelings, fears and motivations. In Howard Gardner’s view it involves having an effective working model of ourselves, and to be able to use such information to regulate our lives.

More at SOURCE

Further Reading:

  • Gardner, Howard. Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York: Basic,1983
  • Gardner, Howard. Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice. New York: Basic, 1993.

Kindest Regards,

Think Yourself Happy @UjenziBora

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~ by ujenzibora on July 27, 2010.

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